23 January, 2006

Profiting from the Word

Earlier this month I gave the English Puritan, Richard Greenham's suggestions on how to read the Scriptures with diligence. (See: 4 Jan. 2006) I would like to give another Puritan, Thomas Boston (1676-1732) on how to profit from the reading of the scriptures. Thomas Boston was a Scottish Presbyterian and he was best known for his aid in the Marrow Controversy. Boston gives nine ways to improve on the reading of the scriptures:

1. Follow a regular plan in reading of them, that you may be acquainted with the whole; and make this reading a part of your private devotions. Not that you should confine yourselves only to a set plan, so as never to read by choice, but ordinarily this tends most to edification. Some parts of the Bible are more difficult, some may seem very barren for an ordinary reader; but if you would look on it all as God's word, not to be scorned, and read it with faith and reverence, no doubt you would find advantage.

2. Set a special mark, however you find convenient, on those passages you read, which you find most suitable to your case, condition, or temptations; or such as you have found to move your hearts more than other passages. And it will be profitable often to review these.

3. Compare one Scripture with another, the more obscure with that which is more plain, 2 Pet. 1:20. This is an excellent means to find out the sense of the Scriptures; and to this good use serve the marginal notes on Bibles. And keep Christ in your eye, for to him the scriptures of the Old Testament look (in its genealogies, types, and sacrifices), as well as those of the New.

4. Read with a holy attention, arising from the consideration of the majesty of God, and the reverence due to him. This must be done with attention, first, to the words; second, to the sense; and, third, to the divine authority of the Scripture, and the obligation it lays on the conscience for obedience, 1 Thess. 2:13, "For this reason we also thank God without ceasing, because when you received the word of God which you heard from us, you welcomed it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which also effectively works in you who believe."

5. Let your main purpose in reading the Scriptures be practice, and not bare knowledge, James 1:22, "But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves." Read that you may learn and do, and that without any limitation or distinction, but that whatever you see God requires, you may study to practice.

6. Beg of God and look to him for his Spirit. For it is the Spirit that inspired it, that it must be savingly understood by, 1 Cor 2:11, "For what man knows the things of a man except the spirit of the man which is in him? Even so no one knows the things of God except the Spirit of God." And therefore before you read, it is highly reasonable you beg a blessing on what you are to read.

7. Beware of a worldly, fleshly mind: for fleshly sins blind the mind from the things of God; and the worldly heart cannot favour them. In an eclipse of the moon, the earth comes between the sun and the moon, and so keeps the light of the sun from it. So the world, in the heart, coming between you and the light of the word, keeps its divine light from you.

8. Labour to be disciplined toward godliness, and to observe your spiritual circumstances. For a disciplined attitude helps mightily to understand the scriptures. Such a Christian will find his circumstances in the word, and the word will give light to his circumstances, and his circumstances light into the word.

9. Whatever you learn from the word, labour to put it into practice. For to him that has, shall be given. No wonder those people get little insight into the Bible, who make no effort to practice what they know. But while the stream runs into a holy life, the fountain will be the freer.

4 comments:

Droll Flood said...

"This is an excellent means to find out the sense of the Scriptures; and to this good use serve the marginal notes on Bible."

-Finding Bibles with edifying marginal notes tends to be a bit difficult these days.

"4. Read with a holy attention, arising from the consideration of the majesty of God, and the reverence due to him. This must be done with attention, first, to the words; second, to the sense; and, third, to the divine authority of the Scripture, and the obligation it lays on the conscience for obedience"
-He's not splitting these up but maintains them all at once (e.g.):
-The first would mean nothing apart from the third, making no warrant to pay attention
-The first has no meaning apart from the second

"1. Follow a regular plan in reading of them, that you may be acquainted with the whole; and make this reading a part of your private devotions. Not that you should confine yourselves only to a set plan, so as never to read by choice, but ordinarily this tends most to edification."
-This is by far the most difficult way of Bible study. To follow threads of thought through a text is laborious, however if one studies this way, they tend to know the text inside and out.
-Also, I maybe kicking against the pricks a bit here given Petrus Dathenus's custom in catechism preaching in my Continentally Reformed Tradition. I see that cat. preaching can tend (not absolutely) to isolate texts or hop skip and jump through the Bible. I way more prefer to learn the text in and out then application flows easily from that and can be discerned by the congregation and applied. As one pastor said, "I'd rather err on the side of exegesis in a sermon's time rather than on the application's time." If one knows the text then the application comes easily, the hard stuff being done, then it is a matter of letting God's Word search and mold your soul particularly.

Classical Presbyterian said...

Great thoughts for us all.

Which study Bible do you prefer-for the notes? I love the notes in the Spirit of the Reformation, but don't like the NIV, but I also like the notes in Sproul's Reformation Study Bible and LOVE the ESV. But the Reformation has no confessions!

What I would like to see is the S.of R. notes in the ESV version.

Droll Flood said...

1560 Geneva Study bible notes
http://www.thedcl.org/bible/gb/index.html

Ellie said...

I'm humbled at the long road ahead as I get more into the word.
"Letting Gods Word search and mold your soul particularly." Beautiful God Stuff!!!