22 October, 2005

The Most Grand Puritan Resource

Thursday, October 22nd, 2005, marked a great day for Puritan Reformed Seminary, as well as the greater Reformed and Presbyterian community. Rev. Dr. Sinclair Ferguson addressed the Puritan Reformed Seminary in dedicating the "Puritan Resource Center".

Here is how the Puritan Resource Center is being advertised by the Seminary:

The Puritan Resource Center houses one of the world's largest collections of seventeenth and eighteenth century antiquarian volumes written by Puritans, as well as numerous modern-day Puritan reprints and secondary sources about the Puritans. Seminary professors, theological students, and ministers are welcome to use these valuable resources under certain conditions. Those doing doctoral studies or on sabbatical leave are also welcome to study in the Resource Center. For further details, please contact the registrar, Henk Kleyn (616-977-0599, ext 120; henk.kleyn@puritanseminary.org; Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary, 2965 Leonard NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49525 ). Visit our website at www.puritanseminary.org

Here are the four points that Dr. Ferguson made in his adress, What can the Puritans teach us today?

1. The significance of spiritual brotherhood in the movements of the Holy Spirit.

2. The vital significance of the recovery of the pulpit in the Church.

3. They developed an understanding of the gospel that was deeply Trinitarian.

4. They recognized the centrality and the significance of the Church in the purposes of God.

Discussion Point:

-What has been the most influential Puritan work to your Christian life?

10 comments:

Not quite blissfully ignorant said...

The Westminister standards and a Brakel?

shawn said...

Hey Nate, if they recorded the lecture, which I am sure they did. How can I get a copy?

-shawn

Also - What has been the most influential Puritan work to your Christian life?

Greg Barrow - Covenanted Reformation Defended.

Not that others have had great influence upon me, strengthening that which I was being taught from the pulpit, but this one work caused me to consider the importance of
-God's Truth
-The Church's duty to God's Truth
-Faithfulness and unfaithfulness
-Separation and unity
-Terms of Communion
-The ordinance of Covenanting
-The blueprints for faithful testimony bearing
-so much more than even this

Nate said...

Shawn

The lecture was on sermonaudio.com but I was unable to find it otherwise I would have linked it. (Maybe it will be up later.)

I will ask though if their are CDs available for us students. (He mentions covenanting as well...but you will have to listen to find out more!!)

Also....Influential Puritan....Greg Barrow?? What on earth are you talking about?
I mean Puritan in the 16/17th century context (Perkins, Owen, Watson, Sedgwick).

The guy before you has a Brakel...that'll work too. a Brakel is second Dutch reformation. Dutch Puritanism would be fine too.

I did not mean 20/21st century Canadian Puritan :)

Try again....

shawn said...

Also....Influential Puritan....Greg Barrow?? What on earth are you talking about?
I mean Puritan in the 16/17th century context (Perkins, Owen, Watson, Sedgwick).


I knew I'd get a comment out of you on that one.

To be sure, my elders have been the single most influential human intervention to my growth in grace.

These guys are Puritans in their own rspected rights.

But since you make further qualifications *grin:

I'm sure you don't count the Westminster Standards, or the Solemn League and Covenant as Puritan works - So I will have to say, at this point, Gillespie's Wholesome Severity Reconciled with Liberty of Conscience - because it got the gears to begin to grind in a different direction.

A close second being John Brown of Wamphray's Christ: the Way the Truth and the Life

Third being Henry Scudder's The Christian's Daily Walk.

Of Reformer's Works I have been greatly influenced in my thinking from William Whitaker's Disputations on Holy Scripture.

Close to that I have really enjoyed much of Calvin's Commentaries.

Hope that makes the list. thanks. I feel like I am forgetting something.

Nate said...

of course the Westminster Standards are Puritan works!!

The SLC is too.

Adam Allogy said...

Why would a Brakel be considered a 'puritan'? And wasn't "puritan" a mocking term at least at one point. If it was, wouldn't that be like the negroes calling one another... or it wouldn't be the same on account of the fact that purity is a virtue while the other alluded to word is a vice having connotations of a lazy, thieving, worthless, trying-to-get-what-you've-not-worked-for-type.

Nate said...

A Brakel is called a Dutch Puritan. There was a significant number of Reformed people in the Netherlands that sought for the purity of worship, church, and life as did the Puritans of England, Scotland, Wales, Geneva, Ireland, Americas, etc.

Puritanism was a movement that was transcontinental and took on some varriance.

A Brakel is one of my favorites too.

Nate said...

Correction....
"variance"

shawn said...

Why would a Brakel be considered a 'puritan'? And wasn't "puritan" a mocking term at least at one point.

Many titles have begun as derogatory name calling, like the name Christian used first in Antioch, or those of "The Way".

But I would take this as a compliment to be called Puritan, to be called Christian. It is like some in my family that say, "You only believe things that the Bible teaches, how closed-minded." to which I reply, thanks!

Adam Allogy said...

What word does "Adam Allogy" sound like...
Who do you know who would almost drop anything to pursue a word's root and just plainly can't resist a pun?
...I wonder...